Gramsci and the debates
in the formation of the
Italian Communist Party
2:30PM SUNDAY 20 AUGUST
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In the early 1920s two groups in Italy claimed allegiance to the Communist International formed out of the victory of the Russian revolution - the Italian Communist Party (PCI) and the left wing of the Italian Socialist Party (PSI). While the Comintern urged merger of the two forces, inside the PCI debate raged. The dominant forces of the Left around Amadeo Bordiga argued for the complete separation of the PCI from all competing forces as a principle. The Centre around Antonio Gramsci argued instead that winning over the workers loyal to the PSI was essential to building a revolutionary party. Differences about theory, party-building and the prospects for revolution in the West underpinned the debate.

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